Anthropogeny Publications Exchange (APE)

The Anthropogeny Publications Exchange (APE) is a resource for anthropogeny-related publications informing on human evolution, origins, and uniqueness. It also serves as a reference repository for the Matrix of Comparative Anthropogeny (MOCA). The number of possible additions to APE are limitless, however we have chosen to focus on those with a maximum relevance to anthropogeny using the following criteria:

  • Relevance for understanding the evolutionary origins of the human species
  • Research that informs on the origins of uniquely human features
  • Comparative studies of other species relevant to understanding human uniqueness
  • Broad interest and appeal to CARTA members
Click on the column headers to sort by those attributes. Use the "Reset" button in the search form to remove any search filters.

Displaying 2801 - 2820 of 2820 publications

Filter publication list
URL Titlesort ascending Authors # Comments Related MOCA Topics Year of Publication Date Added
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0047248416300070 42,000-year-old worked and pigment-stained Nautilus shell from Jerimalai (Timor-Leste): Evidence for an early coastal adaptation in ISEA M. Langley et al. 0 2016 2016-08-19
http://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(17)31195-8 40,000-Year-Old Individual from Asia Provides Insight into Early Population Structure in Eurasia M. Yang et al. 0 2017 2017-10-16
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17360606 4,300-year-old chimpanzee sites and the origins of percussive stone technology. J. Mercader et al. 0 2007 2014-05-10
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-06803-z 3D virtual reconstruction of the Kebara 2 Neandertal thorax A. Gómez-Olivencia et al. 0 2018 2018-11-01
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25654325 3D morphometric analysis of fossil canid skulls contradicts the suggested domestication of dogs during the late Paleolithic. A. Drake et al. 0 2015 2015-02-11
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0047248416301683 3D enamel thickness in Neandertal and modern human permanent canines L. Buti et al. 0 2017 2018-01-03
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25993961 3.3-million-year-old stone tools from Lomekwi 3, West Turkana, Kenya. S. Harmand et al. 0 Tool Manufacture and Use, Tool Making 2015 2015-05-20
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24114781 2000 years of parallel societies in Stone Age Central Europe. R. Bollongino et al. 0 2013 2013-11-08
https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.03.13.990523v1 100,000 years of gene flow between Neandertals and Denisovans in the Altai mountains B. Peter 0 2020 2020-04-09
http://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2018/11/28/science.aau0008 1.9-million- and 2.4-million-year-old artifacts and stone tool–cutmarked bones from Ain Boucherit, Algeria M. Sahnouni et al. 0 Tool Manufacture and Use 2018 2018-12-03
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26064624 'Neanderthal bone flutes': simply products of Ice Age spotted hyena scavenging activities on cave bear cubs in European cave bear dens. C. Diedrich 0 2015 2015-04-02
http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9067859&fileId=S138020381300024X 'Man the Symboller'. A Contemporary Origins Myth T. Hopkinson 0 2013 2015-01-15
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25439628 'Fire at will': the emergence of habitual fire use 350,000 years ago. R. Shimelmitz et al. 0 2014 2014-12-12
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26440979 "Vision for Action" in Young Children Aligning Multi-Featured Objects: Development and Comparison with Nonhuman Primates. D. Fragaszy et al. 0 Tool Manufacture and Use 2015 2015-10-07
"Bar-coding" primate chromosomes: molecular cytogenetic screening for the ancestral hominoid karyotype. S. Müller et al. 0 Chromatin-Stained Banding Patterns 2001 2016-06-28
The uniquely human capacity to throw evolved from a non-throwing primate: an evolutionary dissociation between action and perception J. Wood et al. 0 Accurate Overhand Throwing 2007 2016-06-23
https://www.edge.org/conversation/mirror-neurons-and-imitation-learning-as-the-driving-force-behind-the-great-leap-forward-in-human-evolution Mirror neurons and imitation learning as the driving force behind “the great leap forward” in human evolution V. Ramachandran 0 Dancing 2000 2016-06-30
http://science.sciencemag.org/content/360/6395/1296.abstract How did Homo sapiens evolve? J. Galway-Witham et al. 0 2018 2018-06-27
Children's Unspoken LanguageS G. Sneddon 0 Emotional Flushing (Blushing) 2003 2016-07-01
Bregmatic Fontanelle Bones in Mammals A. Schultz 0 Age of Fontanelles / Cranial Sutures Closure 1923 2016-06-23

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