Is the Human Mind Unique?

Event Date (Pacific Time): 
Friday, Feb 15, 2013 -
1:00pm to 5:30pm
Event Chairs:

Terrence Deacon, University of California, Berkeley
V.S. Ramachandran, University of California, San Diego

Scientists from many different fields gathered to discuss cognitive abilities often regarded as unique to humans including humor, morality, symbolism, creativity, and preoccupation with the minds of others. Emphasis was placed on the functional uniqueness of these attributes, as opposed to the anatomical uniqueness, and whether these attributes are indeed quantitatively or qualitatively unique to humans. 

 

Event Sessions

Media for each talk can be played by clicking on icons in the "Media" column, or by clicking on the individual talk titles below and then the attachment file at the bottom of the page.

Media Session Speakers
File Welcome and Opening Remarks Fred Gage, Salk Institute
V.S. Ramachandran, University of California, San Diego
File Symbolic Communication: Why is Human Thought so Flexible? Terrence Deacon, University of California, Berkeley
File Desperately Seeking Explanation Daniel Povinelli, University of Louisiana at Lafayette
File An Evolved and Creative Mind Steven Mithen, University of Reading
File Humor Daniel Dennett, Tufts University
File Archaeological Evidence for Mind Colin Renfrew, University of Cambridge
File Entering the 'Soul Niche' Nicholas Humphrey, Senior Member, Darwin College, University of Cambridge
File Skilled Performance and Artistry Merlin Donald, Queen's University
File Moral Sense Patricia Churchland, University of California, San Diego
File Inter-Modular Interactions, Metaphor, and the 'Great Leap' V.S. Ramachandran, University of California, San Diego
File Wrap Up, Question and Answer, and Closing Remarks Terrence Deacon, University of California, Berkeley
V.S. Ramachandran, University of California, San Diego
Ajit Varki, UC San Diego School of Medicine